“Official” Taggart’s Applesauce

Available at the orchard this week: Gala, Macoun, Spartan & Cortland. 

(Empire could mature as early as this weekend – please call the orchard for the most up-to-date list of what’s ripe)

DSC_2745

One of the most common questions we hear at our apple stand is “What’s the best cooking apple?” Our answer is “Any apple makes for a good cooking apple”!  It’s true!

With the exception of Red Delicious, which is strictly a snacking apple, any of our varieties would work just fine in your pies, crisps, cobblers, breads and sauces.  Sure, there might be a few qualities to consider: A firmer apple will hold its shape better in a pie and a tarter apple might be a better choice in recipes with added sugar.  But don’t over think it!

In our homes, we simply use what we have on hand – more often than not it’s a mixture of varieties.  Keeping that in mind, we’d like to share the “official” Taggart applesauce method!

IMG_3751.JPG

  1. Gather your apples. This batch contained Gala, Macintosh, Ginger Gold, Cortland and Empire (whatever you have on hand).
  2. Peel, core and slice – no need to chop or dice!
  3. Place in a slow cooker.
  4. Heat on high for 4 hours or low for 8 hours.

That’s it!

I prefer my sauce with a chunkier, rustic texture – I simply stir the cooked mixture with a spoon and call it a day.  Alternatively, you could use a blender for a smoother puree.  I typically keep mine sugar free but feel free to add sugar and/or cinnamon to taste.  It’s ready to eat, store in the fridge or freeze!

Enjoy!

 

 

October Apples

We have quite a selection of apples this week!

Golden (Yellow) Delicious are here!  This is popular eating apple is the sweetest variety we have at the moment.

We also have Cortland apples: tart and great for baking.  Many folks enjoy snacking on them, too.

Empire and Spartan varieties are a mix of sweet and tart.  Empire are naturally a smaller sized apple, making them perfect for lunch boxes.  Both would make great pies and sauce, too.

Empire apples

Empire apples

We are expecting Red Delicious and Jonagold to be ready this weekend, but please call ahead to check.  Apples reach their peak at slightly different times each year due to the weather.  We won’t sell them until they’re ready!

Of course, we have more 30th Anniversary photos and memories to share with you!  The doors to the apple barn in opened in 1985, and as you can see we have preserved the “historical integrity” of the structure!  Not much has changed in 30 years!

1987 | Taggart's Orchard apple barn - looks remarkably similar today!

1987 | Taggart’s Orchard apple barn – looks remarkably similar today!

Kermit and Louise Taggart operated the orchard by themselves until their daughter, Nancy, and husband John returned to the family farm in 1989. Nancy and John (Tilley) have assumed more orchard duties in recent years as they have both retired from careers in non-profit fundraising and banking, respectively.

1989_2

1989 | He may not be a Taggart by birth, but John has proven himself useful over the years 🙂

While the first Taggart apple trees were planted in 1983, we continued to add to the orchard through the 80s and early 90s.  You can see immature trees and their stakes in the background of the photo below:

1989 | Kermit and Louise pose by a new section of orchard.

1989 | Kermit and Louise pose by a new section of orchard.

Some of these trees have ended their useful life and have been removed from the orchard in recent years.  However, we are making plans to replant to continue growing and selling apples!  Stay tuned!

1987 | Katelyn, a grand-daughter of Kerm and Louise, gets her first taste of agriculture (literally!) and makes plans to run the farm one day!